Meet Vicki; a BRCA2 previvor who will be trekking the Sahara for CoppaFeel!

Every day we’re grateful that we have the chance to meet and get to know some of you; the wonderful ladies of Valiant! And we are proud to have the opportunity to share your stories.

Today’s guest blogger is the amazing Vicki (aka @route_to_previve). Vicki had a bilateral mastectomy with direct to implant reconstruction in February 2020. She says that, after years of uncertainty over the timing of her operation, she feels very fortunate that her surgery went ahead and wasn’t cancelled due to Covid 19. Vicki says that “2020 is going to go down in history but for me it will always be the year I swapped my nipples for scars and dramatically reduced my risk of breast cancer.” 

Here’s Vicki’s wonderful guest blog:

“I was 26 when I first found out there was a 50/50 chance I had inherited a BRCA2 gene mutation from my mum and shortly after I had my first appointment with the genetics team. During that appointment I was told that if I was to get tested straight away I wouldn’t be offered screening until turning 30 and that I should consider completing my family first (I already had my daughter).

If I had been told that now I would have gone home and done lots of research but maybe I wasn’t quite ready to accept the reality of a positive test result back then, so I did exactly as advised – I had another baby and waited until just before my 30th!  

Having a 50% chance of being at high risk of cancer is a big thing to have hanging over you for a few years. It triggered anxiety, a very unhealthy obsession with checking my boobs (at my worst points, a few times a day) and several visits to the GP and a visit to the breast clinic with various concerns about my boobs.  

When I received the phone call to tell me I had tested positive I already knew I wanted a preventive mastectomy and began the consultations straight away.

As my potential surgery date got closer I made the decision to postpone because my son was still little and I was really worried I wouldn’t be able to give my body the time it needed to recover properly.

Looking back I’m not sure it was the right decision and it had a terrible effect on my mental health but when it comes to BRCA there is no right or wrong choice. You have to follow your gut and in that moment it felt like the right thing to do.  

I visited my GP in January 2019 for a referral back to my surgeon however due to an admin error I didn’t get an appointment with him until the December.

Feeling 100% ready for surgery but being completely powerless to do anything about it was really hard especially knowing there would be another 8 or so months wait once I got put onto his surgery list.

At my appointment I burst into tears as soon as my surgeon walked in, uncontrollable barely able to talk tears, relief that things would start to move forward mixed with frustration that it had taken so long to get the appointment.

A couple of weeks later I got a call with a surgery date for 6 weeks’ time as I had been put on the urgent list. I was extremely grateful that I wouldn’t have another long wait but absolutely terrified it was happening so soon.  

The next 6 weeks was a complete emotional rollercoaster; from “bye bye boobs” bottomless brunch and a final photoshoot, to tears and therapy. However, the last few days before my surgery I felt surprising calm, after years of saying “one day I will have a double mastectomy”, it was finally happening!  

BRCA has taken my boobs and will soon claim my ovaries too but it has given me a love and confidence for my body that I’ve never had before, incredible new friends, a passion for fundraising and amazing opportunities. I am very lucky to be part of the team trekking 100km across the Sahara Desert for CoppaFeel! next March.

Instagram has been such a powerful tool in my journey. The support and understanding from the BRCA community is incredible. Christen (@brcachatter) sharing her post op photos gave me the first insight into what to expect from my own surgery and Kim (@nipplesoptional) who met me for coffee, answered all my pre op questions and has been at the end of the phone for support ever since.

My friends and family have all been really supportive and I’m truly thankful. But they can never understand in the same way as someone who is living with BRCA and that’s why I decided to share my own story on Instagram in the hope it may help someone else the same way others have really helped me.”

Thank you so much, Vicki, for sharing your story with us. We completely agree with you; the support and understanding from the community is amazing. And we hope that by continuing to share our stories we are helping someone out there to feel less alone.

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